More Kirkpatrick Model Templates and Examples

Kirkpatrick Model

Kirkpatrick Model

Kirkpatrick Evaluation Model

Kirkpatrick Evaluation Model

Employee Engagement Action Plan

Employee Engagement Action Plan

Employee Engagement Action Plan Template

Employee Engagement Action Plan Template

Org Chart Template with Responsibilities

Org Chart Template with Responsibilities

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Guide and Best Practices

The Kirkpatrick model is used to analyze the effectiveness of employee training programs, measure how well the trainees have learned, and improve their training in the future. The Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation was first introduced by Donald Kirkpatrick in 1959, and was updated in 1975 and in 1993 by his son James and him. Later in 2016, James and his wife introduced the "New World Kirkpatrick Model" in their book, "Four Levels of Training Evaluation" after revising the original theory with an emphasis on the importance of making training relevant to the daily jobs of employees. The model consists of four levels; Reaction, Learning, Behavior, and Results. Each level progressively informs how successful a training program has been.

Kirkpatrick Levels of Evaluation

  • Reaction: At this level, the response of the learners is evaluated. This helps identify whether the training provided was engaging and relevant to the jobs they are doing. You can gather their feedback through surveys or interviews. Based on their reactions, you can make improvements to the future iterations of the program.
  • Learning: This is where you measure how successfully the participants have learnt. This helps identify how the training has helped them develop their knowledge, skills, attitudes, confidence, and commitment. To successfully measure this, you can test your employees against the learning objectives of the program before and after the training. You can also measure their learning with verbal assessments and interviews.
  • Behavior: Here you evaluate how the training has influenced the behavior of the participants and how they are applying their newfound knowledge to do their jobs. You can conduct interviews or observations to measure the behavior. Also create opportunities where the participants can effectively apply what they have learned and encourage and reward these positive changes in behavior.
  • Results: Analyze the impact the training program and the changes in behavior has on your overall business and whether it has brought on a good return on investment. While this step is more time-consuming and costly than the others, you can conduct short-term observations and evaluations to identify whether the training program has made worthwhile improvements to the performance of the team.

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